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Need help? Call (844) TX-VOTES

Frequently Asked Questions


Which forms of ID can be used to vote? +

Bring one of the following items to your polling place:

  • TX Driver’s License issued by the Department of Public Safety
  • TX Personal ID card issued by the Department of Public Safety
  • TX concealed handgun license issued by the Department of Public Safety
  • TX Election ID Certificate issued by the Department of Public Safety
  • US military ID card with your photo
  • US Certificate of Citizenship or US Certificate of Naturalization with your photo
  • US passport book or card

These photo IDs must be current or have expired no more than 4 years before you vote. Click here for more information.

Don’t have a photo ID? Don’t worry. You can still vote!

If you’re a registered voter but do not possess one of the documents listed above, don’t worry, you can still vote a regular ballot! Here’s how:

Sign a declaration stating that:

  1. You are who you say you are at the voting booth and,
  2. have a reasonable impediment or difficulty for having an accepted photo ID, and,
  3. provide: a valid voter registration certificate, or a certified birth certificate (must be an original); or a copy or original of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or government document with your name and an address thereon (a government document with your photo must be original).

Know Your Rights

Your name as printed on your ID does not need to exactly match your name as it appears on the registration rolls. As long as the two versions of your name are substantially similar, you will be allowed to vote on a regular ballot.

Your address as printed on your ID does not need to match your address as it appears on the registration rolls. Even if these addresses are completely different, you will be allowed to vote on a regular ballot.

If you have a documented disability or religious objection to being photographed, you can apply for an exemption from the photo ID requirement at your local registrar’s office.

Need to get an ID?

If you don’t have one of the accepted IDs, you can get a free Election ID Certificate from your nearest Department of Public Safety Office, or at one of the Secretary of State’s mobile ID stations.

In order to get a free Election ID Certificate, you’ll need to bring documentation with you to verify your identity and to show that you are a U.S. citizen. Most people need an original birth certificate plus two supporting documents.

If you don’t have your birth certificate, you can get one from a Vital Records Office for free (if you go in person and tell them you need a birth certificate for voting), or online for $22.

How do I vote by mail? +

You can request a ballot by mail if you are over the age of 65, disabled, out of the county during early voting and on election day, or confined to jail. The last day to apply to vote early by mail is October 26. (Received, not Postmarked.)

You can learn more about voting by mail here at MyTexasVotes.

Where can I find if I am registered to vote? +

To confirm your voter registration status, you may select one of three methods to perform a search:

  • Your Texas driver’s license number, if you provided it when you applied for voter registration;
  • Your Voter Unique Identifier (VUID), which appears on your voter registration certificate;
  • Your first and last name.

Confirm your voter registration status.

When are the polls open? +

Polls are open at various times during early voting and from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. on Election Day. Find out the latest hours for nearby polling locations using the search tool at the top of this page.

Note: Polling place hours vary at each early voting location during the Early Vote period. If you’re in line to vote before 7 p.m., stay in line! You are legally allowed to vote.

What if I moved to another county? +

If you moved to another county, YOU MUST HAVE RE-REGISTERED TO VOTE IN YOUR NEW COUNTY BY OCTOBER 9, 2018. Unfortunately, the deadline for registering to vote was October 9, and has passed. If you were unable to re-register in your new county before the deadline, you may be able to vote a “limited” ballot on candidates or issues common between your old and new counties.

You may only vote this “limited” ballot after you have moved to your new residence, during the early voting period by personal appearance at the main early voting polling place (not on Election Day) or by mail (if otherwise qualified to vote by mail) and if:

  • You are a current registered voter in your former county;
  • You would be eligible to vote in your former county on Election Day, if you were still living in that county;
  • You have not re-registered in the new county, or, if you have re-registered, the effective date of the new registration will not be effective on or before Election day.
  • If you feel you qualify to vote a limited ballot, we recommend that you contact the office of the Early Voting Clerk in your new county.

What are my rights? +

You have the right to:

Bring a friend or family member for assistance
Under federal law, you can bring an assister of your choice into the voting booth to help you vote. You can also ask for a poll worker to assist you.

Ask for a new ballot if you make a mistake
Under federal law, you have a right to a new ballot if you make a mistake.

Vote no matter what, even if it’s a provisional ballot
If you arrive late in the day and are in line when polls close on Election Day, stay in line because you have the right to vote as long as you arrive while polls are open between 7am and 7pm. If you’re told you can’t vote a regular ballot and you’re in the correct precinct, try to correct the problem. If you’re not able to, ask for and cast a provisional ballot.

Bringing your child into a polling place
You can bring your child with you when you cast your ballot.

Vote without a photo ID
If you’re a registered voter but do not possess one of the approved photo IDs listed above, don’t worry, you can still vote a regular ballot! Here’s how:

Sign a declaration stating that (1) you are who you say you are at the voting booth and (2) have a reasonable impediment or difficulty for having an accepted photo ID, and (3) provide: a valid voter registration certificate, or a certified birth certificate (must be an original); or a copy or original of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or government document with your name and an address thereon (a government document with your photo must be original).

If your name is different on your ID
Your name as printed on your ID does not need to exactly match your name as it appears on the registration rolls. As long as the two versions of your name are substantially similar, you will be allowed to vote on a regular ballot.

Your address as printed on your ID does not need to match your address as it appears on the registration rolls. Even if these addresses are completely different, you will be allowed to vote on a regular ballot.

If you have a documented disability or religious objection to being photographed, you can apply for an exemption from the photo ID requirement at your local registrar’s office.

Get a photo ID for free
If you don’t have one of the accepted IDs, you can get a free Election ID Certificate from your nearest Department of Public Safety Office, or at one of the Secretary of State’s mobile ID stations.

In order to get a free Election ID Certificate, you’ll need to bring documentation with you to verify your identity and to show that you are a U.S. citizen. Most people need an original birth certificate plus two supporting documents.

If you don’t have your birth certificate, you can get one from a Vital Records Office for free (if you go in person and tell them you need a birth certificate for voting), or online for $22.

Curbside Voting
Any voter that would experience significant challenges to voting inside the polling location may vote from their vehicle. The Election Judge must send a clerk out to a voter’s car with all materials needed for them to vote. No election official has the right or the authority to tell a voter that they are ineligible for curbside voting.

It is the responsibility for all poll workers to understand how to operate all equipment used for voting, including the Direct Record Electronic “DRE” device. Poll workers have no authority to question a voters eligibility to use the DRE. Each polling place must have at least one accessible voting machine.

For the speediest service, we encourage individuals that may need additional time or assistance to vote during non-peak hours (between 11-3pm).

What if I was affected by Hurricane Harvey? +

The Texas Secretary of State has made accomodations for Texans affected by Hurricane Harvey -- for example, if your ID was destroyed or is now inaccessible because of the hurricane, or you’ve been displaced from your home, there are resources to ensure your ballot is counted.

Click here for more information.

I need more help. Who can I call? +

If you have any questions or need help, call (844) TX-VOTES.

  • You have the right to cast a ballot in secret, free from disclosure and intimidation.
  • If an election official questions whether you can vote, you are always entitled to cast a provisional ballot, which records your vote while election officials look more closely at your records.
  • If you can’t prepare your ballot because of a physical disability, or because you can’t read it, you have the right to assistance from a person of your choice.
  • If you can’t enter the polling place without assistance or without injuring your health, you have the right to have an election officer deliver a ballot to you at the entrance or curb of the polling place; you may also request that a person of your choice accompanying you to the polling place be allowed to bring the ballot to you and deposit it for you.
  • If you can’t communicate in English, you have the right to select an interpreter to communicate with election officials and translate the ballot for you.
  • As long as you are in line to vote at 7 p.m. when the polls close on Election Day, you are entitled to cast your ballot, no matter what.

If you have a problem:

  • If you’re not sure where your polling place is, you can contact your county’s local election official.
  • If the officials at the polling place tell you that you’re not at the right polling place, they should look up your polling place and tell you where it is.
  • If you see any problems, or if you have to vote a provisional ballot, you should report them immediately by calling (844) TX-VOTES.

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